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Mason County News
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AROUND THE SQUARE
Wednesday, July 14, 2010 • Posted July 14, 2010

Give me an A.

Give me a T.

And a T-O-R.

For real legalese, give me an N-E-Y.

A-T-T-O-R-N-E-Y.

AKA "lawyer."

The brunt of jokes.

Demon to some.

Saviour to others.

Usually pillars of the community.

Some concur there’s too dang many of ‘em.

(Kinda like realtors.)

Sooner or later, ya gotta have one.

For legal advice.

Write up a will.

Probate property.

Execute contracts.

Contest a lawsuit.

Defend in a divorce.

Battle for custody.

Fight at trial.

All in all, a pretty tough bunch.

Other countries call them barristers or solicitors.

It all started back in the ancient world.

(Greece, Rome, China, and the Biblical lands.)

Apparently the practice of law limped along for several hundred years.

Then the Dark Ages put the kabash on the legal profession altogether.

No surprise.

(It wasn’t called the Dark Ages for nuthin.’)

Time passed.

Eventually light appeared at the end of the legal tunnel.

By 1200, lawyers were well on their way to becoming an essential part of society.

Yet, from the get-go, people viewed them as guilty until proven innocent, i.e. trustworthy.

And they complained of there being too many lawyers.

This was back in the late 1700s in France and Prussia.

In the 1800s, England and the U.S. chimed in.

Followed by Germany and Australia in the 20th Century.

Not easy being in law.

Can’t win for losing.

Here we have (in alphabetical order):

Jerry Bearden (judge).

Shain Chapman.

Rob Hofmann (judge).

Jack Lee.

Gerald Geistweidt.

Laird Palmer.

Rebecca Whitworth.

David Young.

Scott Zesch.

A list that proves the old saying:

"There is no such thing as a one-lawyer town."

Have you hugged your attorney today?

That’s Mason.

Renee Walker is an author, poet, and real estate broker on the square.

This article has been read 95 times.
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