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Little Jimmy Dickens, Johnny Bush & Georgette Jones At The Llano Country Opry
Wednesday, January 11, 2012 • Posted January 11, 2012

The Llano Country Opry will stage two shows on Saturday, January 14, at the Lantex Theater in downtown Llano. The matinee show begins at 2:30 PM and the evening performance will start at 7:30 PM. Country Music Hall of Famer Little Jimmy Dickens, Johnny Bush, Georgette Jones and Bobby Lewis will all be featured in this star studded show.Admission is $15.00 each and tickets are on sale at the Llano Chamber of Commerce, Lively Computers in Kingsland and KNEL Radio in Brady. Tickets can be charged by calling (325) 247-5354. Little Jimmy Dickens began his musical career in the late 1930s, performing on a local radio station while attending West Virginia University. He soon quit school to pursue a full-time music career, and traveled the country performing on various local radio stations under the name “Jimmy the Kid.”In 1948, Dickens was heard performing on a radio station in Saginaw, Michigan, by Roy Acuff who introduced him to Art Satherly with Columbia Records and officials from the Grand Ole Opry. Dickens signed with Columbia in September and joined the Opry in August. Around this time he began using the nickname, Little Jimmy Dickens, inspired by his short stature.Dickens recorded many novelty songs for Columbia, including “Country Boy,” “A-Sleeping at the Foot of the Bed” and “I’m Little But I’m Loud.” His song “Take an Old Cold Tater (And Wait)” inspired Hank Williams to nickname him “Tater”. Later, telling Jimmy he needed a hit, Williams wrote “Hey Good Lookin’ specifically for Dickens in only 20 minutes while on a Grand Ole Opry tour bus. A week later Williams cut the song himself, jokingly telling him, “That song’s too good for you!”In 1962 Dickens released “The Violet and the Rose,” his first top ten single in 12 years. During 1964 he became the first country artist to circle the globe while on tour, and also made numerous TV appearances including The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson. In 1965 he released his biggest hit “May The Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose” reaching number one on the country chart and number fifteen on the pop chart. In the late 1960s he left Columbia for Decca Records before moving again to United Artists in 1971. That same year he married his wife, Mona, and in 1975 he returned to the Grand Ole Opry. In 1983 Dickens was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.He joined the In The Heat of The Night” television cast for the CD “Christmas Time’s A Comin’” by performing “Christmas Time’s A Comin’” with the cast on the CD released on Sonlite and MGM/UA for one of the most popular Christmas releases of 1991 and 1992 with Southern retailers.Recently, Dickens has made appearances in a number of music videos by fellow country musician and West Virginia native Brad Paisley. He has also been featured on several of Paisley’s albums in bonus comedy tracks along with other Opry mainstays such as George Jones and Bill Anderson. They are collectively referred to as the Kung-Pao Buckaroos.Dickens is now the oldest living member of the Grand Ole Opry at the age of 91.Johnny Bush began his career as a member of Ray Price’s Cherokee Cowboys. He then joined Willie Nelson as a drummer and member of his Record Men. Bush and Nelson remained close and would aid each other with a hit song.His recording career began to take off in the late 1960’s with songs like “My Cup Runneth Over” “There Stands The Glass” “Undo The Right” “Green Snakes On The Ceiling” “My Joy” and “You Gave Me A Mountian.” He received the Most Promising New Artist from Record World in 1968 and 1969. Music City News named Bush the Most Promising Male Vocalist in 1970. The credits continued to come in 1970 as BMI chose Bush for their BMI Songwriter Achievement Award.Bush rose to fame throughout the country music industry with his recording of “Whiskey River” in 1973. The Library of Congress now recognizes the song as one of the all time Top 20 country music standards.The National Council of Communicative Disorders and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association honored Bush with their 2001 Annie Glenn Award at the 20th Anniversary Communication Awards at the Kennedy Center Terrace Theater. The Annie Glenn Award, first presented to James Earl Jones, is presented annually to an individual who has had a communication disorder and through his success, serves as an inspiration to others. Other recipients of the Annie Glenn Award have been Sen. John Glenn, President Bill Clinton, Jenny Craig, Sen. Bob Dole and Mark Herndon of Alabama.In August of 2003, Bush was inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame. The award was presented to Bush for his major contributions to Texas Country Music in the annual ceremony in Carthage, Texas. Willie Nelson inducted Bush into the Hall of Fame along with Kris Kristofferson and Lefty Frizzell.Now recording for Heart of Texas Records, Bush has just released his latest project “Who’ll Buy My Memories?” The sixteen song CD was produced by Justin Trevino and recorded at the Heart of Texas Studios in Brady.Georgette Jones will make a special appearance at the Llano Country Opry. The daughter of George Jones and Tammy Wynette, Jones has enjoyed a tremendous birth to her Country Music career. She has two albums out on Heart of Texas Records and has gained a large international following.Bobby Lewis will also make a guest spot. The long time Grammy nominee has just returned to the spotlight with his new project titled “Then And Now.” It includes some of his older hits along with some new songs as well.The Llano Country Opry Band will consist of Justin Trevino, Bode Barker, Shane Lively, Charley Walton, Sammy Geistweidt and Don Ricketson. Tracy Pitcox will MC the show.

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